Chess master Garry Kasparov loses to computer in first of 6-game match: This Day in History

Twenty-four years ago on Monday, a world chess champion came up against a force too great to overcome: a computer.

Garry Kasparov lost the first game of a six-game match on February 10, 1996, against Deep Blue, an IBM computer capable of evaluating 200 million moves per second.

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Chess enthusiasts watch World Chess champion Garry Kasparov on a television monitor as he holds his head in his hands at the start of the sixth and final match against IBM's Deep Blue computer in New York. Kasparov lost this match in just 19 moves giving overall victory to Deep Blue with a score of 2.5-3.5. / AFP / STAN HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP via Getty Images)

Chess enthusiasts watch World Chess champion Garry Kasparov on a television monitor as he holds his head in his hands at the start of the sixth and final match against IBM’s Deep Blue computer in New York. Kasparov lost this match in just 19 moves giving overall victory to Deep Blue with a score of 2.5-3.5. / AFP / STAN HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP via Getty Images)

He ultimately beat the machine with three wins. The chess battle attracted worldwide attention and was followed by more than 6 million people via the Internet.

A rematch occurred in 1997 and the computer, which was enhanced by then, prevailed. Kasparov lost the last game of the six-match series in 19 moves.

He went up against another computer program in 2003 called Deep Junior and battled to a tie.

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Kasparov retired from professional chess in 2005 and has worked as a Russian pro-democracy advocate, according to this website. He is considered one of the greatest chess players in history.

Originally appeared at
The Daily Caller